Send Thanks to the Tar Sands Protesters

I’ve been stewing all weekend.  I’m not able to join my fellow climate hawks in Washington D.C. for this week’s Keystone XL pipeline protests.  I want to help out, but the main thing that’s needed is more people to participate in the ongoing acts of civil disobedience.  Since I can’t be there, I’ve been thinking about what I could do to help out from a distance.  I finally hit on it tonight.  I’m turning tonight’s post into a Thank You card for the protesters.  They are sticking their necks out for the rest of us.  The least we can do is say thanks.  Please join me in thanking the protesters for their bravery, and leadership, on this critical issue.  I’ll then forward this on to those who are there.  (Update: I apparently wasn’t clear with my request.  I’m asking that you share your thoughts for the protesters in the comments section below. Thanks!)

If you’re in need of a bit of inspiration, here’s a letter from tarsandsaction.org site, which is being used to inform our citizenry.

President Barack Obama will decide as early as September whether to light a fuse to the largest carbon bomb in North America. That bomb is the massive tar sands field in Canada’s Alberta province. And the fuse is the 1,700-mile long Keystone XL Pipeline that would transport this dirtiest of petroleum fuels all the way to Texas refineries.

I am writing you now because the Keystone XL Pipeline is a climate and pollution horror beyond description. From August 20th to September 3rd, thousands of Americans – including Bill McKibben, Danny Glover, and NASA’s Dr. James Hansen – will be at the White House, day after day, demanding Obama reject this tar sands nightmare. Given the high stakes, many protestors will engage in peaceful civil disobedience, day after day to make their voices heard.  Already the attention this event is getting will likely make it the biggest act of civil disobedience in the climate movement’s history.

I’m going to be there, and I hope you will join me – this action, and this issue needs your voice. This action will be going on for two weeks, but to participate, you should plan to be in DC for three consecutive days between Aug. 20 and Sept. 3 that you can make it to DC, and let the world know just what you think of the tar sands.  Click here to sign up:http://www.tarsandsaction.org/sign-up/

If built, the Keystone XL Pipeline would lock America into a future of planet-warming energy dependency. Indeed, Dr. Hansen – America’s top climate scientist – has said that full exploitation of Canada’s tar sands would be “game over” for efforts to solve climate change.

President Obama alone – without input from Congress – has the power to approve or reject the Keystone XL Pipeline. He will decide as soon as September whether to honor his campaign pledge to create a clean-energy economy, or to lock us in as a nation that cooks and distills filthy tar sands for much of our energy. Building this pipeline will be an economic and moral setback for clean-energy sources of all types. This is a line in the sand. The tar sands!

Here’s the link to sign up again: http://www.tarsandsaction.org/sign-up/

Let me know if you have any questions, thoughts or concerns – I hope you’ll join us. This is just too important to stay home.

Here’s a brief video from a protester, Jane Kleeb, in which she details one of the potential dangers of the tar sand oil.

If you want to keep up with the action in D.C., check out the tarsandsaction Flickr photo stream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tarsandsaction/

I don’t typically go with a hard sell in requesting comments, but I think it’s important today.  Please join me in thanking those brave souls who are leading the climate fight in our stead.  They deserve all the praise and support we can give them.

Image by: tarsandsaction

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3 thoughts on “Send Thanks to the Tar Sands Protesters

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